How “Broke Millennial” Stopped Being Broke

There are a lot of things I love about running TFD, but I’d be lying if I didn’t say that one of the absolute best things is the near-complete absence of dudes. The core team is five women, nearly all of our contributors are women, our audience is almost entirely women, and most of our industry friends are smart, funny young women who have undertaken the same task of bringing financial literacy to other young women. Our lawyer, accountant, and web developer are dudes, but with the exception of those relatively-rare interactions, my professional life is decidedly female — something that not everyone gets to experience, and something that I won’t have forever in my professional life. It’s an experience I cherish, particularly when I consider that for most men, the idea of being surrounded by 90% men in an immediate professional context is totally normal. I have been, more than once, the only woman in the room. To experience the reverse is freeing and empowering.

And beyond just making my day-to-day work life a warm and rewarding thing, being exposed to so many brilliant and ambitious women has been powerful for my social life. It’s now totally normal for me to enjoy a weeknight dinner with a few women where we exclusively talk money, business, and politics — it’s not something that was totally absent from my life before, but it was certainly a rarer thing. As the lines between peer, colleague, and friend blur, I realize that the “boy’s club” of most of the professional world (where the effortless networking tends to happen, over whiskeys and steaks and back-slaps) is something that desperately needs recreating for those of us who have always been, by nature, excluded from it. Long story short, forming a “girl’s club” has felt like a vibrant and necessary thing in my recent life.

Erin Lowry, founder of Broke Millennial, is one the members of said informal “girl’s club.” She’s a whip-smart and deeply warm person, whose interest in making women better with money is genuine and egalitarian: she believes that anyone can learn to speak the language of finance, no matter what they’re working with. Erin was kind enough to sit down with me last week and talk about her money philosophies, her mistakes, and how she navigated New York City on $23,000 a year. Enjoy our interview below!

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  • Eloise

    “…but I’d be lying if I said one of the absolute best things is the near-complete absence of dudes.”

    Is this what you mean to write?

    • another anon

      TBH I would just chalk it up to a clunky way of saying she appreciates her all female team.

  • Mj D’Arco

    Let’s fight exclusion with more exclusion, let’s fight intolerance with intolerance.. k got it

  • jessdarb

    I preordered mine!

  • Oh sorry… didn’t know this was a women only club… I guess I will be going now…

    • batya

      Too bad that’s not what she said. Also, what would happen if women said that about…almost everything? “Oh, sorry, didn’t know that this was a man’s club…guess I will be going now…” How many great female contributions and leaders would we be without?

      • FYI: This is the part I was commenting on: “but I’d be lying if I didn’t say that one of the absolute best things is the near-complete absence of dudes.”. Did you take my meaning the way I intended it – probably not. I live a very sarcastic life. Extra kind of related note – I am in the only male in an office with 9 females – not that it matters cause we are just worm food no matter what sex, race, rich/poor, what ever you are.

        I didn’t send her hate mail or unsubscribe to her site or youtube channel… I am still looking forward to the articles she puts out and the advice that she puts out there.

        Oh and about the video – the most helpful part was the last of it where you renamed the ugly “B” word. Thank you for that. It does make working with money a lot more game like.

  • Ana

    Boys club? Girls club? Are we in middle school?

    I work in a team, and I do not judge my coworkers by gender, just as they do not judge me. I am a young professional – I also happen to be female, but that doesn’t play any role in my ability to have a career, be friends with colleagues, or be good with money.

    • nicolacash

      When people say “I don’t see race,” that doesn’t stop institutional racism from existing. Similarly, you effectively saying that you don’t see gender doesn’t stop other women from being underpaid for the same jobs as men, harassed at work, mansplained at work, and a host of other obstacles that simply don’t exist if you work in an all-female environment. It’s no surprise why a lot of women feel more comfortable and supported in the presence of other working women.

      • Wolf

        On the other hand, how does working in all-female groups solve institutional sexism?
        It just makes us look line we need a protected, special space. And I don’t want that. I want to be equal, not special.

  • batya

    “my professional life is decidedly female — something that not everyone gets to experience, and something that I won’t have forever in my professional life. It’s an experience I cherish, particularly when I consider that for most men, the idea of being surrounded by 90% men in an immediate professional context is totally normal. I have been, more than once, the only woman in the room. To experience the reverse is freeing and empowering.”

    Heck yeah. Anyone who has attended an all-female school knows what she is talking about. Being around all girls/women, as a girl/woman, is AWESOME and totally unique. When did it become taboo to promote “female-only?” I guess most millenials are too young to remember when “Take Your Daughter To Work Day” was hijacked by “Take your Child to Work Day.” Because apparently boys need more professional role models and we don’t want them to feel “excluded”? That’s counterproductive and missing the point.

  • Mary Burke

    I love the concept of setting up “baby gate” to access money. It’s such a smart and easy way to check your spending.

  • Rebecca Ann

    Considering that the world of finance has been traditionally male-dominated, I love that this page is predominantly female. You all need to chill, and stop wasting time writing unnecessary hate-comments, don’t you have better things to spend your time on? It is possible to read something online that you don’t agree with and just move on.

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