The 7 Personal Finance Articles We Love This Week

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This week marked my last week in New York City, and I’m honestly scared to calculate some of the expense totals. For example, I was not great keeping my cab expenses low. I personally think that if you don’t feel super comfortable with your surroundings, and it’s very late, you should take a cab. However, I used that rationale a few too many times. I’m heading back to Boston for a few weeks before going home to LA, and I’m so excited to be back in a place that I understand how to get around, because it will force me to only walk and take the metro — or rather, the T. As my time in NYC comes to an end, I’ve been thinking about doing a reduced-spending challenge when I get home to LA to offset the fact that I low-key made it rain in terms of taking cabs.

In other news, I spent a lot of my week comparing bus tickets, versus car rental prices, versus plane tickets, because I’m going to Montreal to see family in about a week. I have to say that bus ticket prices will never fail to astound me. I am getting to Montreal for $50 on a bus, and I’m getting home to Boston for about $20. Overall, shopping around for bus tickets forced me to get real with my current financial state. I would so much rather fly, or even take a train, but as I’m still waiting for a few checks that are going to show up across the country, it’s really more responsible for me to take a bus. Getting honest with yourself, and making the less desirable but more financially-responsible decision isn’t always easy, but it’s important to be able to face reality.

While reading through the personal finance articles we love this week, I asked myself the 10 easy money questions that Rockstar Finance provided. And as it turns out, I do know what two plus two is, I know how much money I have, and how much money is in my emergency fund. I don’t know my net worth, though, so that’s something I ought to look into. I highly recommend you all try asking yourself them, and I look forward to hearing everyone else’s reactions to the seven links below that Rockstar Finance was kind enough to share with us. Enjoy!

1. Can You Answer These 10 Easy Money Questions? — Rockstar Finance

“If you can’t answer these ten money questions, your homework for today is to be able to answer them and be in bed by 10:30… like a boss!”

2. The Power of 1% — Afford Anything

“Once you’ve chosen your targets, make incremental progress a daily habit. Send one email to a potential client daily. Read one article per day about investing. Save one percent more money than you did last month.  One percent improvements create champions over time.”

3. 6 Things You Might Not Know About Getting Out of Debt — The Frugal Farmer

“What would you do if you lost your job today? … What would you do if debtors’ prison was implemented in your country? … What would you do if one or all of your creditors demanded immediate payment in full?”

4. What’s in Your Golden Circle? — No More Harvard Debt

“What is your financial Golden Circle? Why do you financially live the way you do? How do you do it, and what does it create for you?”

5. 14 Ways to Save Like a Broke Millennial — Business Insider

“Honey is a browser extension that automatically searches for coupon codes and sales whenever you are checking out online. All you have to do is click the Honey button, and it will search, find and apply coupon codes to your shopping cart. It takes no extra work on your part and can save you money.”

6. The Magic of Measuring the Right Thing — Seth Godin

“What you measure usually gets paid attention to, and what you pay attention to, usually gets better. Numbers supercharge measurement, because numbers are easy to compare. Numbers make it difficult to hide. And hence the problem.”

7. How to Save 20% of Your Income in Your 30s — PT Money

“Today I want to show you how over the ten years of our marriage we’ve saved an average of 20% of our pre-tax income towards retirement. In our worst year, we saved 10%, and in our best, nearly 40%!”

Image via Unsplash

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  • Summer

    I really like the 1% article. Breaking things down into percentages often makes them seem far more manageable anyway, but breaking them all the way down to 1% makes it so easy that it’s almost silly not to try to improve. I don’t remember on which article, but someone recently commented here about looking at their student loans in terms of 1% increments and it changed my own perspective for the better. Progress is progress, no matter how small and seemingly hopeless.